Notice of Annual General Meeting 

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETINGJUNE 21, 2017 AT 7:00PM

St John Ambulance Training Centre

(1 St. John’s Ambulance Way on the South side of Portage off the Empress Overpass across from Polo Park Centre. Doors open at 6:30pm with the meeting beginning at 7pm)

 

Hello. Hopefully this finds you well and happily enjoying the sun – and no flooding!

This year’s Annual General Meeting is an important one to continue our mandate of working toward managed water levels on Lake Manitoba. Given the number of ‘back channel’ meetings with the government, this is a great opportunity to keep members current.

Scott Forbes will review the data for water levels around the lake and challenges that will follow until the new outlet is completed. The executive will review policy decisions by the Province to lessen inflows into Lake Manitoba. We will endeavor to provide a progress report on the new outlet.

The constitution provides for three reps per beach association to attend the meeting. There will be opportunities to express opinions and determine the composition of the executive board. Because ALMS is a representative organization your interest and attendance is vital.

We believe that the Association must continue to fulfill its mandate of informing residents along Lake Manitoba and to advocate for an egress to allow for managed lake levels. The current Provincial government has demonstrated a willingness to work with us to achieve both goals.

Jack King

 

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Lake Manitoba update: May 28, 2017

This has been a week of little change. Lake Manitoba remains very high (813.67 ft), as does Lake Winnipegosis (835.47 ft). Lake St. Martin remains at flood level (802.20 ft), fed by high flows from the Fairford River (12,537 cfs). Flow on the Waterhen River also remains high (12,042 cfs), reflecting the high level of Lake Winnipegosis.

The Portage Diversion remains open but the flow is now a trickle (759 cfs).

Water is still being stored in the Shellmouth Reservoir (1402.62 feet), reducing downstream flows on the Assiniboine, which have fallen to 6,604 cfs at Holland and 5,968 cfs at Headingly.

River update
Time: 9:00 AM May 28, 2017
Portage Diversion: 759 cfs
Assiniboine at Holland: 6,604 cfs
Assiniboine at Headingly: 5,968 cfs
Waterhen: 12,042 cfs
Whitemud: 629 cfs
Fairford: 12,537 cfs
 
Lake update
Time: 9:00 AM May 28, 2017
Steep Rock: 813.58 ft
Westbourne: 813.75 ft
Mean level Lake Manitoba: 813.67 ft
Lake Manitoba desired operating range: 810.5 to 812.5 ft
Lake St. Martin: 803.20 ft
Lake St. Martin desired operating range: 797.0 to 800.0 ft
Lake Winnipegosis: 834.47 ft
Shellmouth Reservoir: 1402.62 ft

Public Interest: Debris from Assiniboine Diversion impacts Delta Beach community

The operation of the Portage Diversion this year has covered the Delta Beach area in debris as shown in this picture supplied by Delta Beach homeowner Lori Olson who shares “This is the exact result of opening up the diversion. This is the worst we’ve ever seen it!”.  Other residents report “its like a lumber camp opened up and left the debris everywhere”. Large logs and debris are causing other hazards as well, making fishing, boating, swimming and other activities dangerous. Residents also worry about damage to property as rising flood waters force large logs and other debris against property structures. 

Delta Beach, located on the very south of Lake Manitoba, is known for its wildlife and historic pristine beaches, left by Lake Agassiz. It is also home to one of the largest fresh water marshes in the world and was designated an internationally important wetland under the Ramsay Convention in 1982. 

The entire area has been impacted by the the debris and silt which has entered Lake Manitoba as a result of the operation of the Portage Diversion which diverts water and debris from the Assiniboine River. Other worries include the large amount of phosphorus entering the lake and its long term impact on the lake’s health. Research on impact has become difficult since the Delta Marsh field station, operated by the University of Manitoba’s faculty of science since 1966, was shut down in 2011 as a result of catastrophic flooding in the spring and extensive damage. 

  
  

Lake Manitoba update: May 21, 2017

Lake Manitoba remains very high, currently 813.68 feet. The real concern, however, is Lake Winnipegosis. It continues to rise, and it remains at a record high level for this time of year, more than 4 feet above its average level. Northwest winds are driving up the gauge reading on Lake Winnipegosis today, currently 835.37 feet, but that number is too high – we will need calm winds to get a good read on the level. If the real lake level is at or above 834.8 feet, that would be very concerning as this will generate Waterhen flows (>13,000 cfs) that will drive Lake Manitoba to flood level. Outflow at Fairford is roughly 13,500 cfs when Lake Manitoba reaches 814.0 feet. If Lake Winnipegosis reaches 835 feet, it is hard to see how Lake Manitoba does not reach flood level. There is the possibility, however, that the current gauge readings for Lake Winnipegosis are in error. The level of Lake Winnipegosis has risen sharply in the last two weeks, perhaps suspiciously so. We have not had much precipitation of late, so one has to wonder where the water is coming from.

Waterhen flows this morning dropped with the wind swinging around to the NW and are now just 11,583 cfs. Waterhen flows were registering over 12,500 cfs midweek. Flow on the Whitemud continues to drop and is now just 699 cfs.

Lake St. Martin remains above its flood level and is currently 803.17 ft. Its level is being driven higher by high inflow from the Fairford River which are being driven higher today (12,502 cfs) by the NW winds.

Flow on the Portage Diversion is now very low, just 1024 cfs, having a minor effect on the level of Lake Manitoba.

Water is still being stored in the Shellmouth Reservoir (1402.43 feet), reducing downstream flows on the Assiniboine, which are now 10,065 cfs at Holland and 7,134 cfs at Headingly. A gauge calibration raised the estimate of flow at Holland this week.

River update
Time: 1:30 PM May 21, 2017
Portage Diversion: 1,024 cfs
Assiniboine at Holland: 10,065 cfs
Assiniboine at Headingly: 7,134 cfs
Waterhen: 11,583 cfs
Whitemud: 699 cfs
Fairford: 12,502 cfs
 
Lake update
Time: 1:30 PM May 21, 2017
Steep Rock: 813.58 ft
Westbourne: 813.78 ft
Mean level Lake Manitoba: 813.68 ft
Lake Manitoba desired operating range: 810.5 to 812.5 ft
Lake St. Martin: 803.17 ft
Lake St. Martin desired operating range: 797.0 to 800.0 ft
Lake Winnipegosis: 834.51 ft
Shellmouth Reservoir: 1402.43 ft

Lake Manitoba update: May 14, 2017

Lake Manitoba rose this week with the midweek rain. The current level is roughly 813.7 feet but strong and shifting winds this week make getting a good read on the lake level difficult. Lake Winnipegosis remains very high (834.51 ft, wind affected) and is keeping inflow  via the Waterhen River (currently 11,901 cfs but also affected by shifting winds) also very high. Our main problem this year and last has been the continued high level of Lake Winnipegosis, which is still rising. The level of Lake Manitoba cannot fall until the level of Lake Winnipegosis falls.

Inflow from the Waterhen and Whitemud Rivers (954 cfs) is now slightly higher than outflow at Fairford (12,219 cfs, affected by wind). Rainfall will therefore cause the lake to rise, as was the case earlier this week, when the lake jumped about 1/10th of a foot. Evaporation does not begin to have a significant effect on the lake level until the heat of summer (June – August).

Lake St. Martin is now well above its flood level of 803.0 feet, and is currently 803.20 ft. Its level is being driven higher by high inflow from the Fairford River that is driven by the high level of Lake Manitoba.

Flow on the Portage Diversion is now very low, just 1165 cfs, but it remains open.

Water is still being stored in the Shellmouth Reservoir (1401.9 feet), reducing downstream flows on the Assiniboine, which are now 9,888 cfs at Holland and 8,864 cfs at Headingly.

River update
Time: noon May 14, 2017
Portage Diversion: 1,165 cfs
Assiniboine at Holland: 9,888 cfs
Assiniboine at Headingly: 8,864 cfs
Waterhen: 11,901 cfs
Whitemud: 954 cfs
Fairford: 12,219 cfs
 
Lake update
Time: noon May 14, 2017
Steep Rock: 813.47 ft
Westbourne: 813.94 ft
Mean level Lake Manitoba: 813.71 ft
Lake Manitoba desired operating range: 810.5 to 812.5 ft
Lake St. Martin: 803.20 ft
Lake St. Martin desired operating range: 797.0 to 800.0 ft
Lake Winnipegosis: 834.51 ft
Shellmouth Reservoir: 1401.90 ft

Lake Manitoba update: May 7, 2017

Lake Manitoba is now approaching its peak level as flows on the Portage Diversion decline. We have been lucky that the period of peak flows on the Assiniboine coincided with an extended stretch of dry weather, keeping the level of Lake Manitoba below flood level. Lake St. Martin, however, continues to rise and has now reached its flood level of 803.0 feet.

The gauge readings today are only approximate as shifting winds are causing rapid oscillations in lake levels and some river flows. The current estimate of the level of Lake Manitoba is 813.62 feet. Natural inflows from the Waterhen (11,583 cfs) and Whitemud Rivers (855 cfs) remain roughly in balance with outflow at Fairford (12,572 cfs). The Portage Diversion flows have fallen steadily over the last week and are now 3,532 cfs. This level of flow now has a very small effect on the lake level. If that flow remained unchanged over the next month, the lake would rise a further two inches.

The operation of the Diversion to this point has not caused the lake to rise beyond its equilibrium level, where natural inflow balances natural outflow. That is in the range of 813.6 to 813.7 feet, where the lake is now. The lake would have gotten there anyway without the operation of the Diversion. What the added inflow from the Diversion has done is get us to that level faster. Had the Diversion flows reached higher levels for longer periods (as earlier forecasts had projected), the lake would have risen beyond its equilibrium level, perhaps to flood level. With continued dry weather, the lake will remain close to its current level for the foreseeable future.

The high level of Lake Manitoba generates high outflows on the Fairford River which causes Lake St. Martin to rise. It is currently 803.07 feet, above its flood level of 803.0 0 feet.

Water is still being stored in the Shellmouth Reservoir (1400.98 feet), which continues to reduce downstream flows on the Assiniboine, which are now 12,290 cfs at Holland and 9,464 cfs at Headingly.

River update
Time: 10:00 AM May 7, 2017
Portage Diversion: 3,532 cfs
Assiniboine at Holland: 12,572 cfs
Assiniboine at Headingly: 9,464 cfs
Waterhen: 11,583 cfs
Whitemud: 855 cfs
Fairford: 12,572 cfs
 
Lake update
Time: 10:00 AM May 7, 2017
Steep Rock: 813.55 ft
Westbourne: 813.68 ft
Mean level Lake Manitoba: 813.62 ft
Lake Manitoba desired operating range: 810.5 to 812.5 ft
Lake St. Martin: 803.07 ft
Lake St. Martin desired operating range: 797.0 to 800.0 ft
Lake Winnipegosis: 834.06 ft
Shellmouth Reservoir: 1400.98 ft